Book Club

The Center does not have a book club however we recommend the monthly morning book club, which meets on one Tuesday morning a month to discuss a selected book over a cup of something nice.

See below for the full list of what is being read, and get in touch with us if you would like to join one of the clubs: Julie Hu for the morning book club mcelroy22000@yahoo.com. Everyone is welcome!

Upcoming Books:

Book Club

February 09: Just Mercy, by Bryan Stevenson.
March 9:  The Nightingale, by Kristin Hannah
April 13:  The Glass Cage, by Nicholas Carr.
May 11:  The Beekeeper of Aleppo, by Christy Lefteri.
June 8:  Disloyal: A Memoir: The True Story of the Former Personal Attorney to President Donald J. Trump, by Michael Cohen.
July 13: The Giver of Stars, by Jojo Moyes.
August 10: Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents, by Isabel Wilkerson.
September 14: American Gods, by Neil Gaiman.
October 12: The Choice: Embrace the Possible, by Edith Eger.
November 9: The Stolen Bicycle, by Wu Ming-yi.
December 14: 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, by Yuvel Noah Hariri.

 

February 09

Just Mercy,

by Bryan Stevenson
2015.

An unforgettable true story about the potential for mercy to redeem us, and a clarion call to end mass incarceration in America—from one of the most inspiring lawyers of our time. It tells the story of Equal Justice Initiative, from the early days with a small staff facing the nation’s highest death sentencing and execution rates, through a successful campaign to challenge the cruel practice of sentencing children to die in prison, to revolutionary projects designed to confront Americans with our history of racial injustice.


 

March 09

The Nightingale,

by Kristin Hannah.
2015

With courage, grace and powerful insight, bestselling author Kristin Hannah captures the epic panorama of World War II and illuminates an intimate part of history seldom seen: the women’s war. It tells the stories of two sisters, separated by years and experience, by ideals, passion, and circumstance, each embarking on her own dangerous path toward survival, love, and freedom in German-occupied, war-torn France—a heartbreakingly beautiful novel that celebrates the resilience of the human spirit and the durability of women. It is a novel for everyone, a novel for a lifetime.


 

April 13

The Glass Cage

by Nicholas Carr
2014

Best-selling author Nicholas Carr digs behind the headlines about factory robots and self-driving cars, wearable computers and digitized medicine, as he explores the hidden costs of granting software dominion over our work and our leisure. Even as they bring ease to our lies, these programs are stealing something essential from us. Drawing on psychological and neurological studies that underscore how tightly people’s happiness and satisfaction are tied to performing hard work in the real world, Carr reveals something we already suspect: shifting our attention to computer screens can leave us disengaged and discontented.


 

May 11

The Beekeeper of Aleppo,

by Christy Lefteri
2020

With courage, grace, and powerful insight, bestselling author Kristin Hannah captures the epic panorama of World War II and illuminates an intimate part of history seldom seen: the women’s war. It tells the stories of two sisters, separated by years and experience, by ideals, passion, and circumstance, each embarking on her own dangerous path toward survival, love, and freedom in German-occupied, war-torn France—a heartbreakingly beautiful novel that celebrates the resilience of the human spirit and the durability of women. It is a novel for everyone, a novel for a lifetime.


 

June 8

Disloyal: A Memoir: The True Story of the Former Personal Attorney to President Donald J. Trump,

by Michael Cohen
2020.

Cohen describes his own childhood and his later life as a highly trusted employee of President Trump, only to end up disgraced and in jail.


 

July 13

The Giver of Stars

by Jojo Moyes
2029

Set in Depression-era America, a breathtaking story of five extraordinary women and their remarkable journey through the mountains of Kentucky and beyond. Based on a true story rooted in America’s past, it is unparalleled in its scope and epic in its storytelling. Funny, heartbreaking, enthralling, it is destined to become a modern classic—a richly rewarding novel of women’s friendship, of true love, and of what happens when we reach beyond our grasp for the great beyond.


 

September 14

American Gods

by Neil Gaiman
2001

After three years in prison, Shadow has served his time. But as the days and hours until his release tick away, he can feel a storm brewing…Two days before his release date, his wife Laura dies in a mysterious car crash, in adulterous circumstances. Dazed, Shadow travels home, only to encounter the bizarre Mr. Wednesday, who claims to be a refugee from a distant war, a former god, and the king of America. Disturbing, gripping, and profoundly strange, Gaiman’s epic novel sees him on the road to the heart of America. Basis for the 2017 Starz TV series.


 

August 10

Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents

by Isabel Wilkerson
2020

Beyond race or class, our lives are defined by a powerful, unspoken system of divisions. In Caste, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Isabel Wilkerson gives an astounding portrait of this hidden phenomenon. Linking America, India and Nazi Germany, Wilkerson reveals how our world has been shaped by caste—and how its rigid, arbitrary hierarchies still divide us today. New York Times nonfiction best-seller.


 

October 12

The Choice: Embrace the Possible

by Edith Eger
2017

This is the memoir of Dr. Edith Eger, age 90…an internationally acclaimed psychologist and one of the few remaining Holocaust survivors. At the age of sixteen, along with her parents and sister Magda, was sent to Auschwitz. Edie and Magda survived multiple death camps, and Edie was found barely alive in a pile of corpses when American troops liberated the camps in 1945. Such an extraordinary book on survival and stories of how she has helped others to heal by confronting their suffering and making the “choice” to heal.


 

November 09

The Stolen Bicycle

by Wu Ming-yi
2017

A writer embarks on an epic quest in search of his missing father’s stolen bicycle and soon finds himself caught up in the strangely intertwined stories of Lin Wang, the oldest elephant who ever lived, the soldiers who fought in the jungles of South East Asia during the Second World War and the secret worlds of the butterfly handicraft makers and antique bicycle fanatics of Taiwan. The Stolen Bicycle is both a majestic historical novel and a profound, startlingly intimate meditation on memory, family, and home. Award-winning novelist Wu Ming-Yi is also an artist, designer, photographer, literary professor, butterfly scholar, environmental activist, traveler, and blogger, and is widely considered the leading writer of his generation in his native Taiwan.


 

December 14

21 Lessons for the 21st Century

by Yuvel Noah Hariri
2018

An Amazon Best Book of September 2028: It’s hard to imagine having as many deep thoughts as Yuval Noah Harari. His 2015 book, Sapiens, examined the human race through the vectors of history and biology, illuminating how each has influenced our behavior and evolution. Two years later, Homo Deus took us in the opposite direction, predicting the profound changes we will undergo as technology becomes increasingly intertwined in our lives and bodies. Just a year and a half later, Harari turns his attention to more immediate concerns. Using the same tack-sharp lens as his previous books, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century addresses urgent, shapeshifting topics that will shape our present and near future, including nationalism, religion, immigration, artificial intelligence, and even the nature of Truth—in other words, everything you’re not supposed to talk about at Thanksgiving.